The Cub Scout Uniform

The Boy Scouts of America has always been a uniformed body. Its uniforms help to create a sense of belonging. They symbolize character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness. Wearing a uniform gives youth and adult members a sense of identification and commitment.

  • Personal equality - The uniform represents a democratic idea of equality, bringing people of different backgrounds together in the Scouting tradition.
  • Identification - The uniform identifies youth and adult members of the Boy Scouts of America, visible as a force for good in the community. When properly and smartly worn, the uniform can build good unit spirit.
  • Achievement - The uniform shows the wearer's activity, responsibility, and achievement. The accomplishments of every youth and adult member can be recognized by the insignia worn on the uniform.
  • Personal commitment - The uniform is a constant reminder to all members of their commitment to the ideals and purpose of the Scouting movement. It is a way of making visible members' commitment to a belief in God, loyalty to country, and helping others at all times.

The leaders of Scouting—volunteer and professional—should promote the wearing of the correct, complete uniform on all suitable occasions.


The Cub Scout uniform has the following parts:

  • Shirt—The official uniform shirt is available with long or short sleeves and has button-flap pockets and "Boy Scouts of America" lettered in gold above the right pocket.
  • Trousers or shorts—Official blue.
  • Belt—Official navy-blue web belt with metal buckle and Tiger, Cub Scout, or Webelos Scout emblem.
  • Socks—Official socks are available in three lengths: ankle, crew, and knee. Tigers' socks are navy blue with orange tops. Cub Scouts' socks are navy blue with gold tops.
  • Cap—Official navy-blue cap with orange front panel and tiger cub emblem for Tigers; yellow panel and wolf emblem for Wolf Scouts; blue panel and bear emblem for Bear Scouts.
  • Neckerchief—Triangular neckerchief is orange with navy-blue trim for Tigers, gold with navy-blue trim for Wolf Scouts, light blue with navy-blue trim for Bear Scouts, and plaid for Webelos Scouts. Official BSA neckerchiefs are the only neckerchiefs that boys should wear. Packs should not make their own pack neckerchiefs.
  • Neckerchief slide—Official gold-tone metal slide with the Tiger, Cub Scout, or Webelos Scout logo. Boys may wear handmade neckerchief slides.
What's Required for our Pack
The following is what our pack requires when purchasing your first Cub Scout uniform:
  • Shirt (Long or Short Sleeve)
  • Hat
  • Neckerchief
  • Slide
  • Belt w/Buckle
  • Socks
The shirt will last through third Grade - so size it appropriately.

Optional:
  • Pants or Shorts (You may opt to purchase a lightweight Navy Blue pair of shorts or pants as opposed to the official uniform trousers or shorts)

Each Year:
  • New Hat
  • New Neckerchief
  • New Slide
  • New Socks
The Uniform Code:
We believe that wearing the Cub Scout uniform, in accordance to the standards set forth from the BSA, is following the best traditions of Scouting. 
Your son should/will be encouraged to wear his uniform appropriately.  The shirt should always be tucked in and orderly. He should understand the importance of representing the entire Boy Scout Organization while in uniform.  

Patches You'll need to Buy
  • Scout Emblem (above left pocket)
  • Council Patch*
  • Pack Numbers 
  • Flag comes with the shirt 
  • Den Number (Optional)  
Patches You don't need to Buy
Any Rank Advancement Badge or Patch that your boy earns will be awarded (at no cost) during the Monthly Pack Meetings. You will need to sew them on, but they are provided.

Where to Purchase Items
Before most pack meetings we normally make a trip to the Scout Shop. You might contact the Advancement Chair if you need a patch or two - we might be able to save you a trip and pick them up for you at our cost.  You are also welcome to order any needed items online or however you like.* The Pack may have Council Patches and other standard patches in stock. Check with the Cubmaster, Committee Chair, or Advancement Chair for availability.

Badges and Insignia

For guidance on the proper placement of all badges and insignia, you will have a template layout that comes with each uniform shirt to guide you. Also, see the BSA's Guide to Awards and Insignia.

To get an idea of pricing, or to order items online, visit bsauniforms.org.  This is the new official Boy Scouts of America uniform website. It's a great new way to build out your son's new uniform to see what is involved and to determine the exact costs associated with it.


Wearing the Uniform
In general, every Cub Scout should wear his uniform to all Cub Scouting activities, including den and pack meetings, unit outings, and any activities done with members of the den or pack. 
When playing sports, going to camp, or participating in other physical activities, a pack may opt to have the Cub Scouts wear an alternate uniform, such as an activity shirt. These are referred to as Class B Uniforms.
Pack leaders should provide advance notice of any occasion when the boys should wear anything other than the complete uniform.

Here are some tips for wearing the uniform:
  • DO keep the uniform clean and in good repair. The official uniform is a sturdy, machine-washable garment that will last for years with proper care.
  • DO be sure to wear the complete uniform. A Cub Scout wearing a uniform with parts missing is not in uniform.
  • DO NOT wear non-BSA badges, awards, or insignia on the Cub Scout uniform or make any alterations to the uniform or insignia.
  • DO NOT mix uniform parts with non-uniform clothing, such as wearing a uniform cap with other clothing or wearing the uniform shirt with blue jeans. The uniform should be treated as a unit—worn in its entirety, or not at all.
Any time you are uncertain about uniform regulations, ask the den leader for guidance.